Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Innovation: The Path to Superior OR Teamwork and Results

April 21st, 2017

Healthcare lags behind other industries when it comes to innovation. That’s partly because new treatments must be vetted for safety and efficacy, and partly because fee-for-service reimbursement sparked little incentive for creativity and efficiency. Under value-based purchasing, OR leaders have more opportunity to be innovative, but first they must understand what innovation is (and isn’t) and the ways in which they can promote it.

“Innovation is creating something completely new that doesn’t exist in the world,” says John Kenagy, MD, director of Kenagy & Associates in Longview, Washington, and a clinical professor of surgery at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Read the full article here

Printed in OR Managers Magazine for May 2017, Vol 33 No 5

 

How Health Care Can Innovate, Create Value

January 17th, 2017

Successful organizations need to sense, respond and adapt.
Posted in H&HN on January 12, 2017 by John W. Kenagy, M.D.

Health care is an “attractive” industry. Everybody wants it. It is vital to people, families, neighborhoods, cities, states, countries and their governments. It therefore attracts an abundance of bright, motivated, caring people and some of the world’s most sophisticated technology.

Health care also attracts money. U.S. health care, in particular, has a great deal of financial resources and has attracted a continued inflow of capital. For example, U.S. health care spending was $3 trillion in 2014 and is predicted to consume 20 percent of U.S. gross domestic product in the next few years. That’s a lot of attraction.

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Adaptive Design in Medical Education

November 8th, 2016
Ohio University’s Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine and OhioHealth Doctors Hospital in Columbus, Ohio are collaborating to explore creating Ideal Patient Care in both Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Education. Starting November 2016 in a single OhioHealth Doctors Hospital unit, the objective is to develop Adaptive Design throughout the hospital and simultaneously link to Ohio University’s medical student, resident and fellowship education programs.
For more information contact us!

Healthcare Innovation: Sense/Respond/Adapt series, part 3

August 2nd, 2016

Leading Healthcare in Value and Reliability

Parts 1 and 2 of this series showed how traditionally managed companies are Make/Standardize/Sell organizations – great at improving what they know how to do, but finding it difficult to do what they don’t know how to do. Innovation requires a different set of methods, skills, tools and a different level of thinking – Sense/Respond/Adapt.

This Part 3 is a high level view of how to create Sense/Respond/Adapt capability in any organization. Each step applies to both leadership and the frontline. The key to success is to take them together.

The first step is Awareness. Albert Einstein helps us:

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Healthcare Innovation: Sense/Respond/Adapt series, part 2

May 24th, 2016

Why, How and What

Three weeks ago, Part 1 of this series described how, for the last forty years, we have invested heavily in consultants and technologies to make healthcare more predictable and manageable. The problem is, for all those billions spent, healthcare’s predictability and manageability have declined. Therefore, I proposed the solution is not more consultants and technology, but, identifying the right consultants and technologies.

But how would one differentiate the wrong from the right? That’s a change of mindset that requires awareness of new options and possibilities; an open mindset that can sense a new opportunity. Although that sounds easy, traditionally managed organizations find it difficult to challenge their status quo mindsets. The objective of this series is to take down that barrier and make it easy for you to sense. Only after this first step can you move on to respond and adapt, and really make a difference.

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Healthcare Innovation: Sense/Respond/Adapt series, part 1

May 2nd, 2016

More Consultants and Technologies? Or the Right Consultant and Technology?

 My years as a physician, healthcare executive, academic researcher and patient have taught me one thing for sure: in acute care medicine and management, although our predictions and estimates are usually correct, we really don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow.

If you are a clinician, you know as soon as you say, “Boy, it sure is quiet tonight,” the ambulances from a crash of a busload of hemophiliacs arrive. For an executive, it’s always another unexpected cost, drop in volume, unfunded mandate, regulation, or audit that disrupts our best-laid plans. We live in an unpredictable world because unexpected, unpredictable things happen.

Most of us intuitively know that is true – but why is healthcare so unpredictable?

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Adaptive Design Has “Teal” Characteristics

September 2nd, 2015

Many people sense that the way healthcare is run today has been stretched to the limits. And it’s not just a healthcare problem.

“In survey after survey, business people make it clear that in their view, companies are places of dread and drudgery, not passion or purpose. Further, it applies not to just the powerless at the bottom of the hierarchy. Beyond a façade of success, many top leaders are tired of the power games and infighting; despite their desperately overloaded schedules, they feel a vague sense of emptiness.”

This a quote form The Future of Management is Teal; a fascinating history of the evolution of human organizations from 10,000 years ago to the present day by Frederic Laloux in Strategy+Business.

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Improving Excellence in Healthcare with Dr. John Kenagy

July 29th, 2015

This interview originally appeared in the SPEAKING.com Blog

Dr. John Kenagy is a well-respected physician, executive, academic researcher and lecturer with a unique view of healthcare. Forbes magazine featured Dr. Kenagy as “the man who would save healthcare.”

Success in 21st century healthcare requires more than excellence,
it requires an organization to succeed seeking value rather than volume.

SPEAKING.COM: What are some of the common characteristics shared by successful healthcare organizations?

KENAGY: Excellent care is obviously important, but Centers of Excellence (CoE’s) have been around for a long time – it’s a 90’s term and times have changed. Success in 21st century healthcare requires more than excellence, it requires an organization to succeed in seeking value rather than volume. They work differently than traditional CoE’s, therefore I call them Centers of Value and Excellence (CoVE’s). Characteristics of a successful healthcare CoVE’s include:

a. A clear, consistent, meaningful and patient-centric Value Proposition. 

b. Flexible, responsive, interdisciplinary care teams with everyone working at the top of his or her license.

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17 Years vs. 3 Months

July 21st, 2015

We commonly hear that “implementing Best Practices” is one of the solutions for creating new value in healthcare. I recently came across a social media exchange describing research that shows: ‘it takes an average of 17 years for discoveries about best practices to become part of everyday clinical care.”

17 years?! Yes! It is a well-documented fact. Read the rest of this entry »

Radiology Video

April 28th, 2015

I have used Adaptive Design in clinics & hospitals nationwide and always see the positive results & innovation that generates more and better care at continually lower cost. But it can be difficult to comprehend working adaptively because “you cannot know until you see; and you cannot see until you do.”

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